Medals & Badges - Free France


Croix de Guerre

Croix de Guerre

The Croix de Guerre (sometimes lowercase in French, Croix de guerre, meaning "Cross of War") is a military decoration of both France and Belgium, where it is also known as Oorlogskruis (Dutch). It was first created in 1915 in both countries and consists of a square-cross medal on 2 crossed swords, hanging from a ribbon with various degree pins. The decoration was awarded during World War I, again in World War II, and in other conflicts. The Croix de Guerre was also commonly bestowed to foreign military forces allied to France and Belgium. The French Croix de Guerre was established on 8 April 1915 to commemorate individual mentions in dispatches during WWI. The medal was again authorized, with changes indicated above, in 1939 for WWII. During WWI and WWII, the French Croix de Guerre was awarded to both U.S. Army units and to individuals. The Croix de Guerre may be awarded at different levels of command. The level of the awarding command determines the appurtenance worn on the ribbon. The bronze palm indicates awarded by the Army; a silver gilt star by a corps; a silver star by a division; and bronze star by a regiment or brigade.

Médaille du Patriotes Résistant à l’Occupation du Rhin et de la Moselle

Médaille du Patriotes Résistant à l’Occupation du Rhin et de la Moselle

Medal for the Resistant Patriots of the Rhine and Moselle. This medal was created on 27 December 1954 to be awarded to French residents of Alsace-Lorraine who resisted the annexation of the two departments by the German Third Reich in 1940.






Medaille des Blesses

Medaille des Blesses Medal

The Insignia for the Military Wounded (French: Insigne des blessés militaires) was a French military insignia for wounds received in the line of duty while facing an enemy. It was established by the law of 11 December 1916, based on an idea by the nationalist writer Maurice Barrès. Although originally established as a temporary measure, the insignia has survived to this day in some form or another. It could be awarded to wounded soldiers, prisoners of war, to World War II deportees and internees from the French resistance and to soldiers wounded in more recent conflicts.

Médaille d’Honneur des Groupements de Résistants Combattants et Sanitaires de la Libération

Médaille d’Honneur des Groupements de Résistants Combattants et Sanitaires de la Libération

he medal was awarded after the end of World War II by the Resistance Movement to those who had been active as combatants or front-line medics in the French Resistance in occupied France during the war.






Ordre de la Libération

Ordre de la Libération Medal

The Ordre de la Libération ("Order of the Liberation") is a French Order awarded to heroes of the Liberation of France during World War II. It is an exceptional honor, the second highest after the Légion d’Honneur (Legion of Honour) and only a small number of people and military units have received it, exclusively for deeds accomplished during World War II. The aim of the Order is to "reward people, or military or civilian communities, who will have distinguished themselves in the work of liberation France and her Empire".

La Médaille de la Résistance Française

La Médaille de la Résistance Française

The Medal of the French Resistance. Authorized by Gen. Charles de Gaulle on Feb. 9, 1943 to recognize the courage of French resistance fighters and others who aided the French resistance. Around 45,000 were awarded. There were two classes, distinguished by a rosette on the ribbon.





Médaille des Évadés

Médaille des Évadés

The Médaille des Évadés, "medal of those who escaped", is a medal given by the government of France, to individuals who were prisoners of war and who escaped. The Médaille was created by a 1926 law, intended to honor combatants not only of the First World War, but also of the Franco-Prussian War of 1870. It was later given to combatants of the Second World War as well. It was struck in bronze, being 3cm in diameter and depicting on the obverse a left-facing bust of Marianne wearing an oak-leaf wreath, and on the reverse a similar wreath encircling the legend "MÉDAILLE DES ÉVADÉS". The suspension ribbon is green watered silk with orange bands. To be eligible during WW2, one had to be a French citizen who successfully escaped from either a prisoner-of-war camp or an internment camp.